It’s Official: Plant by Design Native Nursery Has Launched!

Hello to all our readers.  We have some exciting news to share.  Plant by Design Native Nursery has officially launched and will begin selling plants in early April.  Check out our website to learn more and keep up Plant by Design Native Nursery Richmond, VAwith our upcoming events!

Thank you to everyone for your continued support and for helping us make this possible.

www.RVAnatives.com

 

GET WILD, GO NATIVE!

Native Landscape Design Richmond, VA

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Evil Ground Covers!

Last post we discussed Invasive Ivythe removal of an invasive non-native known as Euphorbia amygdaloides.  We got several requests to name ground covers to stay away from and also native options to use instead.

 

 

So here’s a quick list:

DO NOT PLANT:  (No matter what your local nursery says!)

  • Vinca minor (Perrie winkle)
  • Vinca major
  • English ivy  (Shown in picture above)
  • Spicata liriope (Or any liriope for that matter)
  • Ajuga (Some varieties tend to be easier to keep in check so we aren’t totally against this one)
  • Houttuynia cordata (Chameleon plant) – You will hate yourself forever if you plant this one.  It is literally impossible to get rid of.  Why would anyone still sell this???
  • Clematis terniflora (Sweet Autumn Clematis) – We spent all day today removing this one from a residence on Grace St.  It will take several more years to eradicate it.
  • Euyonomus fortunei (Winter creeper)

GREAT NATIVE GROUND COVERS:  (Let us know if you need help locating any of these)
Native Plants Richmond, VA

  • Chrysogonum virginianum  (Green and Gold…shown above)
  • Meehania cordata (Meehans mint… a great substitute for ajuga)
  • Pachysandra procumbens (Don’t confuse this with the non-native pachysandra sold at most garden centers)
  • Lindernia grandiflora  (A great choice for planting between stepping stones)
  • Clematis virginiana (Similar to terniflora but native and less aggressive)
  • Callirhoe Involucrata (Wine cup)
  • Carex pensylvanica  (No need to plant liriope when we have this great native)
  • Phlox subulata
  • Phlox stolonifera
  • Phlox divaricata
  • Aster divaricatus

To sum things up, we at Plant by Design are not purists.  We do believe that planting some non-natives in your landscape is perfectly fine.  The issue comes when the non-natives are more aggressive and out compete our local flora.  The ground covers we have asked you not to plant are invasive.  While walking through the woods its hard not to find Vinca or Ivy choking out our native plants.  Do not be afraid to mention this next time you are shopping at your local garden center.  We never fault the home owner, we fault the garden centers that should be more responsible with the plants they sell.

 

Native Landscape Design Richmond, VA
Plant by Design LLC
http://www.plantbydesign.com

Goodbye Euphorbia :-( Hello Sedge!

A little over 2 years ago I obtained a sprig of Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Robbiae’ from a clients house we were doing work at.  Despite reading about its invasive tendencies I dDSC_0007ecided to give it a try due to its incredible beauty as a dense shady groundcover.  I told myself, “Surely I can keep it in check by regular maintenance”.  Big mistake!  Not only did it quickly spread by masses of runners, but after 2 years I started noticing the plant popping up 10 to 15 feet away from the mother plant.  This told me that itDSC_0006 also spreads readily by seed.  This was the turning point for me.  I knew if I didn’t eradicate the plant soon it would begin to spread into my nearby woods quickly out competing current native species inhabiting it.  I had to say goodbye to my Euphorbia.

The good news is there are plenty of beautiful native ground covers that enjoy similar growing conditions.  The plant I chose to replace this invasive nonnative is a sedge DSC_0013known as Carex pensylvanica.  At first glance it looks like a type of grass but sedges are in fact their own separate thing.  Come next spring the plugs I have installed will begin to fill out to 12″ wide and about 6 to 8″ tall.  It’s a great ground cover to intermix with other plants.  In the photo shown I have both Aruncus dioicus (Goats beard) and Meehania Cordata (Meehan’s mint) in the same area.  I will post photos next year to show its progress.

There are tons of great varieties of native sedge currently in propagation.  A few of our favorites are:
–  Carex pensylvanica
–  Carex woodii
–  Carex Texensis  (More tolerant of sun)
–  Carex Appalachica  (Thinner more delicate leaf)
–  Carex leavenworthii

All of these Sedges do a great job of creating a shady ground cover that can also be used to substitute traditional non native lawns.  The above varieties tend to max out at 6 to 8″ if left unmowed.  IMG_2805
Mowing once a year in winter is a good idea to keep them healthy and full.  Sedges typically spread by runners rather than seed so planting plugs is the preferred method.  If you need help obtaining native sedge for your yard just let us know.

Final thoughts:  No matter how beautiful the non-native plant may be, if it’s invasive, it’s not worth it!  I will be battling seedlings of the Euphorbia for years to come.  Lesson well learned.

Happy gardening!

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Plant by Design LLC
www.plantbydesign.com